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, he joins me. >>> plus tragedy after the prank call to kate middleton. >>> battleground america. >> i'm encouraged that i think we have turned the corner. >> good new job numbers but same old ways in washington. is it too late to save you from paying higher taxes? i'll ask my all-star panel. >>> and she's a fine girl. my old friend brandi back in the spotlight and speaking from the heart about her mentor, whitney houston. >> i felt like i wasn't there enough for her at the end of her life. >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. we begin tonight with our big story, the reality from an estimated 46 million americans. simply put, they can't afford to eat. they live on food stamps. these are men, women and children in america. hunger is not just a third world problem. it's a massive problem right here in the united states right now. cory booker is determined to tackle it. the newark mayor is doing some pretty extraordinary this week, living off food stamps himself, just food stamps. he has just $29 and change for seven days' worth of food. this is what he bought. life-changi
keep the fire going? >> hmm. that's a good question. >>> made in america. the great christmas challenge. >> i know, i know your show. >> she knew, and so did thousands of others. tonight, the big reveal. the videos you sent in, the made in america gifts you put under the tree. and the ones that didn't fit. >> merry christmas, david! >> how you're creating joy and jobs this christmas. >>> and caught on tape. the adorable pet dog stolen, about to be sold. you won't believe what happened next and what we witnessed today. >>> good evening on this wednesday night. and we hope you had a merry christmas. diane has a few more nights with her family, and what a night to stay indoors. across much of this country tonight, a massive winter storm and already, the ripple effect being felt coast to coast. the monster storm system stretching from indiana to maine, all the way to north carolina. more than a dozen states under winter watches and warnings this evening. and this is moving fast. nearly a foot of snow in some states already. a foot of snow forecast for syracuse, new york. and in the heartlan
to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it kerry >> america of the 1930's and 40's comes to life. some of the 1600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sunday at 10:00 p.m. eastern, part of american history tv this weekend on c-span3. >> a discussion on the links between national security and education. speakers included former secretary of state condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public-school, joel klein, hosted by the foundation for excellence and education. this is about an hour. >> welcome to this evening's bought test of morning joe. [laughter] the energy in this room is nice. how this issue of educational reform has ripened, the combination of need, the talent we see in this room. there is a sense that the moment has a ride. the other is jeb bush. i am a great believer that two things matter in life -- ideas and people. that is the driver of change in history. jeb is a perfect example of in what he is doing. he is the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. the fact that you are here is the greatest sa
these things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are bound together monetarily. missouri and washington state are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this
at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by the way. >> that by the way is how the chinese would describe any relationship between japan and america. the interesting aspect of all these conflicts is that as india and china and india and china have a proximate geographically, but we've never been neighbors. >> right. >> in order to be neighbors you either have to love each other or hate each other. we have done neither. in fact, in 1962 during the first strategic conflict, between these two, you have to understand, it's hard to understand why we are not neighbors. [inaudible] in terms of inaccessible. but the positions, the lines, the strategies, the lines, what would they resonate to? the positions that are taken by postcolonial nations is that we will not be bound by decisions made by colonial powers. one, or in china's case, that we had to abandon our national positions. and now that we are strong, we need to resurrect them. right or wrong is not, that is very little to do w
>>> tonight, the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and mutual understanding. yeah, right. not in washington. >> i won't play that game. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> number three, bob costas. did he cross the line? number five, the most outrageous royal prank ever. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. washington's high-stakes game of "let's make a deal," to the royal prank called heard around the world. to bob costas talking about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effe
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> hello and welcome to "bbc world news." a very happy new year 2013. it is already a first of january were you are, this is the greek capital and they're celebrating going around the acropolis. various time zones are coming into the year 2013 and we will keep you up-to-date. not a lot to look at their in athens but we will show you the scene in capital across the next few hours on bbc. there is still a lot of work going on on capitol hill. president obama said a deal is in sight to stop america going over the so-called fiscal cliff. congress officials have said the house of representati
? >>> made in america claims a kind of victory. apple announcing they will bring some jobs back from overseas. but is this the start of something even bigger? >>> hooked. the mom spending up to $200 a month of her virtual farm. and we'll show you other games which keep you coming back with a secret every six seconds. >>> and, the perfect gift made so easy. do you want to create this look under the christmas tree? >> oh, my god! >> scientists tonight give you the simple, amazing way to do it every time. >>> good evening. we begin with the worldwide reaction today to a dangerous move in syria. chemicals, dead lly gas loaded onto weapons near an airfield there. one drop could kill within minutes. so, world leaders are mobilizing tonight, deciding what they're going to do. and abc's senior foreign affairs correspondent martha raddatz takes us inside that story. >> reporter: today, hillary clinton, overseas, trying to tind some dip mroep matic way to end this increasingly dangerous conflict. 20 months of fighting, 40,000 lives lost. and now the chilling possibility of an air attack with deadly ner
with christmas shoppers. this is the type of gun police say he used. an ar-15 semiautomatic rifle. america with more gun stores than grocery stores. tonight, eyewitnesses tell me what they saw when they started. i talk a gun advocate who says there should have been more guns in that mall. and the mother of the aurora, colorado, victims, who thinks the opposite. and talks about guns, north korea's nuclear threat. and the man at both sides of the gun debate, mark kelly. >> president obama hasn't really addressed the gun issue at all. >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight, america armed. a day after another gun outrage, a young 22-year-old shoots up a mall of christmas shoppers in oregon. here's the statistics. there's more than 129,000 federally licensed firearms dealers in this country. that's according to the bureau of alcohol and tobacco. there's 16,000 grocery stores and 14,000 mcdonald's restaurants. far more places to buy guns in america than groceries or burgers. 47,856 people murdered by firearms between 2006 and 2010. two more murdered in clackamas cen
news' brian williams. strength in america? maybe manufacturing here. apple tv living in the legacy of steve jobs. we're going to take a very close look on what is next for america's favorite gadgetmaker. >>> speaking of gadgets, rivalry research in motion, offering training programs and promotions for its upcoming blackberry 10. it's targeted corporations. bold move or maybe a desperate one? >>> any move might be welcome down here. democrats want tax hikes on the rich. republicans want entitlement cuts. we've heard this before, haven't we? what do average americans want to see in a fiscal cliff solution. we've got the exclusive results of our exclusive cnbc all-america economic survey. >>> now to everybody's all-american, sue herera standing by at the nyse. >> you're sweet, ty. thanks. >>> we're a little bit on the downside. we really kind of retraced a little bit on the dow jones industrial average. previous to this we were solidly in the green in all three of the major market indices. the dow now down 14 1/2 points. nasdaq up eight. the s&p is down just a fraction. of course we a
of getting america offer the cliff? senator lindsey graham is telling the president, time to man up. >> the hits keep on coming. >> you may be shocked, you may be debris. some of you be happy, but when you hear this you will definitely have an opinion. >> obama wants to go over the cliff. let me rephrase that. if we go over the cliff, he won't care. >> how about manning up here, mr. president? >> at some point either you'll go over the cliff or find some kind of dramatic concession to the president. >> he's been to pennsylvania. tomorrow he's going to detroit. it's now time to governor. the election is over. he's a small guy. he's afraid of his own party. >> fiscal cliff negotiations proving once again that obama is never worried about trying to fix the problem. >> how about manning up here, mr. president. >> all he's trying to do is fix the blame. >> the president won. he wants to prove he can dominate. >> 15 auto workers fired are back on tle job tonight. >> hey, guys, hate to be a buzzkill, but shouldn't you guys be building cars? don't you guys work out at the chrysler factory?
of that has left america. we still are a world leader when it comes to complex, advanced manufacturing. we make almost 80% of our steel here. we make tremendous amount of planes here, and we're neck-and-neck in manufacturing with china. now, that is a staggering statistic. we make 20% of the world's goods with about 10% of our economy. china makes about 20% of the world's goods with 40% of its economy. we are neck-and-neck as a manufacturer, and it's due to a six-time productivity advantage that we enjoy over china when it comes to manufacturing, and we even have a productivity advantage over countries like japan and germany, countries thought of as manufacturing leaders. i wondered, and i started asking myself, well, what is it that gives us this productivity advantage? what is it that gives american manufacturers this ability to compete? i wanted to go and talk to rail manufacturers because one of the things that when you're in washington and in bureaucracies, you know, you have a lot of people pontificating about the state of american manufacturing and what we need to do without actuall
. .. there would be a change in mr. dsm point, that that might affect america. as the senate are not aware that any change to the treaty in order to go into effect and has any impact on the united states would require the nascent consent? without the advice and consent of the senate, no change could possibly impact united states. >> outhouses the bureaucrats running the program would have clarification word is otherwise vague. the point i am making here is we don't really need to do that when we have her hearing. i understand there's a difference of opinion on this and a lot of motion. i found this morning's roll call magazine, all the people find appeared with the distinguished senator from massachusetts. it doesn't say anything in the articles that certainly attacks the emotions of individuals. so yes, i am not satisfied they would not interfere and do their clarification to change the intent. >> we've taken care of our problem here. >> the mr. president, it's important in this kind of debate as to make a judgment as senators that we base our judgment on facts than on the reality. the senator has
in asia and africa and the americas or do you basically surrender to decline? and i think that requires very tough choices about the time and energy and education systems and welfare systems and being not prepared to tolerate poor performance. >> rose: and rick stengel, managing editor of "time" magazine talking about "time" magazine's person of the year. >> i always like to feel the person who wins person of the year it's both backward looking in terms of the year past and forward looking in terms of what that person will do in the next year and beyond and obama is a perfect example of that. the next america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. caioning spoored by roseommunications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continu
a critical day in future of the unionized america. [bleep] [ yelling ] >> shut your mouth. it wasn't talking to you. put your hands on me and see what happens. >> this is -- >> leave us alone. leave us alone or we'll come for you and get you out of your position. >> eric: but this is probably the most dramatic fox news contributor getting sucker punched by the union thugs. watch. >> get the [bleep] out of my face. get the [bleep] out of my face. >> you hurt a lady -- >> i didn't hurt nobody. get the [bleep] out of my face. back off. back the [bleep] off. >> okay. [ yelling ] [bleep] [ yelling ] >> eric: so why so much anger? why the threat? the answer is simply this. the collective bargaining experiment in america is over. the unions are finished. whopping 20% of the workforce in michigan is one of the most unionized states in america. it's no coincidence that michigan is also the 46th worst state in unemployment. the unions know what is happening. they sense their demise. it's imminent. they're fighting to the bitter end. it won't matter. gor snider is doing what's best for the state? michi
myself, you know, what's the america that we'd like to see for these children when they grow up? what is the america that we're headed towards if we don't correct ourselves? i believe it's still possible to build an attractive future in, say, 2050 for today's children, but it won't be easy, and we haven't got much time to do it. so what does that future look like, how do we get there and what do we do now? these are the questions that i address in the book. and i want to talk about four points that correspond to the four parts of the book. the first is the imperative of system change. if we look at the conditions and trends in our country today, we have to admit it's damn distressing. you know, in the book i review a huge load of problems afflicting our country economically, environmentally, socially, politically and conclude that what we have is a bad case of system failure. and, thus, the imperative of system change. when you have encompassing problems spreading across the entire national landscape, it can't be for small reasons. it's the system, stupid. and we live and work in this
their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> that does it for this edition of "360." see you again one hour from now at 10:00 p.m. eastern. thanks for watching, everyone. "piers morgan tonight" starts now. >>> tonight, show them the money. >> we're still stunned by what's happened. >> america's power ball winners, now $293 million richer. >> i called my husband, i said i think i'm having a heart attack. >> can they ever be the same? i will talk to their closest friends. >>> also, back on the campaign trail. >> we can solve these problems. >> with 32 days to go, will you be paying higher taxes? my political all-stars weigh in on battleground america. >>> and against all odds, after sandusky, penn state's incredible comeback. my exclusive interview with the coach of the year. >>> and a reunion with a dear old friend whose bark is as bad as her bite. sharon osbourne. her incredible year of high
. that would be my big request like everybody else. get america's finances under control and that will take both parties. it will take taxes and it will take reduction in commitments that have been made. it now can be validated. let's get this but do it in a way that exacerbates the uncertain economy. the second -- we have to happen through innovation. whether it is the space program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader o
t numbers on jobs in america. in today's cover story, the company owners of hostess have an unwelcome christmas surprise for workers. plus, coffee talk in today's traders unpugged. what's the better buy: starbucks or green mountain? and, should unions become the high hope for low wage workers? first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas. good morning on this jobs friday. it's december 7th. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: the unemployment numbers. the market expects 90,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november and the unemployment rate will inch up to 8%. stocks and gold rallied ahead of today's numbers on jobs. however, oil slid more than $1 due to a growing supply of gasoline. netflix ceo reed hastings has received a wells notice from the sec. it reportedly has to do with information disclosed on his facebook page. also, according to reports, the washington post may be closer to charging customers to read artcles online. tim mulholland of china-america capital joins us on this jobs friday. t
by securing america's future energy, this is about an hour-and-a-half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the energy security leadership council for being with us today. they have been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's, an entrepreneur, and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special>> i want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. we stand on the shoulders and the time it takes to get these reports. the policy staff, james, leslie, the staff that puts these together, our political staff and the rest of the team at safe. we're seeing more production than we have ever seen before. the most production in the last couple of decades of year on year growth. oil imports are falling. the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. we still continue to have a problem. the report we are releasing today and the subtitle says it all. harnessing american resour
america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a
that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy self- sufficient, that does not mean we would not buy on the world market, but if we could meet our needs in the north american markets, almost all of that money comes back to us. we have no better trading partner than canada. nafta has increased the trading capacity of mexico. it has gone somewhere from the 40% range and a growing and, -- 57 neighborhood to the high 40's to the mid-70s's now, and they are quickly catching up with canada. when you buy energy in north america, they give you the money back. that was a lot to solve the problems. if you make your position better as a nation, suddenly, your numbers
important show for you today. first up today w washington at an impasse, a conversation with one of america's greetest deal makers, james baker, former secretary of state, former secretary of the treasury, fovrmer white house chief of staff on how to stay off the fiscal cliff and what the party should learn from the last election. >>> next, when the u.s. aimed high in the 1960s, we sent a man to the moon w the same effort, we can now cure cancer, that's what the head of the largest cancer center in the word, m.d. anderson says. >>> and america has lost it's number one standing in lotts of areas, from competitiveness to education, the new number one in most cases a scandinavian country, what is the credit sauce? we'll dig into it. but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here is something president obama could do probably by himself that would be a single accomplishment of his presidency, end the war on terror. for the first time since 9/11, an administration official has raised this prospect. said in a speech to the oxford un
that have made america a beacon of hope and freedom. many yearn for basic human liberties. the people of western sa harrah have been trapped in oppressive conditions under the puppet regime. the front has instituted masked kidnappings of people from their homes into western algeria. they have been in prison in camps for 35 years. the front colbrates with the likes of cuba who ration food in the camp and indoctor rin ate children while partnering with al qaeda. they have a plan, which i will submit for the record that addresses these issues with a clear and democratic solution to the sa harrah crisis. this is where america support should lie. mr. speaker, the united states can and must continue to advance fundamental human rights as we in this chamber continue to work together for peace, justice and human dignity in the western sahara. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. are there further requests for one-minute speeches? the house will be in order. members and staff, remove your conversations off the floor. under the speaker's announced policy o
, michael ian black, three names. he is the co author of america, you sexy bleep. and our new york times cory correspondent. go good to see you, irch p. pinch. >> and how it has had an affect on marine mammals. specifically the blue whale population, said one exclusive to the times. >> make it stop. >> i am paraphrasing, of course. greg, still on screen. i believe they call this a two fer. >> >> on sunday night, a day of the week, president obama greeted psy at the annual christmas in washington concert, if that is his real name amid controversy over the anti-american sentiments. he is now known for hiking gangnam style, but huey was once filled with bile. he said "kill those f-ing yankees killing the captives" he has since apologized saying it was part of a deep emotional reaction. he made sure to praise the sacrifice of the troops in a short speech. he engs inked others, but not psy. later he said one performance impressed him. >> good to see that ed asner made the trip. mib, in the green m -- in the green room he didn't bash him enough. >> they were the original koreans. you would rea
tonight. >> america armed. the day after another gun outrage. here are statistics you may find as shocking as i did. more than 129,000 federally licensed arms dealers in this country. there are 36,000 grocery stores and 14,000 mcdonald's grocery stores. the statistic that is the most shocking of all, 42,000 people murdered in the u.s. between 2006 and 2010. thousands running for safety while others ducked for cover. welcome to you both. justin. let me start with you. this is everyone's nightmare. you go christmas shopping and somebody walked in with an assault weapon and somebody starts shooting. what was the first that you sta discovered. >> i was inside macy's at the lanc lancolmb counter. a loud boom happened and i first thought that something had broken. and then there was a second gunshot and repeated ones and i knew this was gun fire and we had a terrible situation. and so, we looked at each other and it was like we understood that we had to do something. >> allen, there have been a number of gun outrages in america in resent months. what goes through your mind when you realize what
, in -- if china ever collapsed and america would have a major problem dealing with that. so u.s. policy has always been during world war ii to keep china as one of the big four. so elevated the place. in reality because of logistical problems, because of strategic priority, as i say europe first, china second, it was pretty low. one very good indicator was our -- [inaudible] you. over 60% is commonwealth countries. somewhere among 25 went to soviet union. during the entire war, less than 2% went to china. so you see, china was very important, but in terms of material support was very small. that was very ironic. has lot to do with rivalry, policy, priorities, logistical difficulties. but overall it's national policy, very important. the time he of course doesn't work the chinese way because americans don't decide to go back to asia. >> how many chinese died during world war ii? >> the numbers vary. the most accepted number during the seven years, eight years of war, remember world war ii lasted a lot longer in china, was 15 million. >> 15 million? >> 50 million. >> that's on par or close to what t
are the challenges that you face trying to make a product in america? >> governor, i never miss a marketing opportunity. on my way in a lot of the steel in your office is made by small companies like mine. the steel that holds up your lights moves your booms, the steel underneath the chairs in the audience. >> that is paper under there. >> be careful out there audience. >> it is made like companies like mine. we are a small steel manufacturer. we started in 93. our product is a commodity product. the steel we sell is the same as the steel made in china or india. there is a big difference, though. in america the rates from much higher. how does the company like mine compete in a global environment where products from china and india and europe are crashing on our shores? >> they are dumping product by having government subsidies to chien needs products that are often then subsidized so they can put you guys out of business on the entire market. that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me. >> there is probably an even more important point about the product that is
that group selection is the reason for human evolution. steve cole, president of the new america foundation, investigates the power and global influence of exxonmobil in "private empire: exxonmobil and american power." for an extended list of ligs to 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> booktv continues now with diana furchtgott-roth. she takes a look at president obama's green jobs initiative and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm howard, vice president for policy research at the manhattan institute. thanks so much for joining us. the question of of whether and how government, particularly the federal government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and can it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one o
. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you had a terrible case of a cancer patient in acute pain, and your diagnosis was, the person is experiencing a pain crisis. it wouldn't be useful. debt is a symptom of 2008, to be precise. it is what happens when a financial implosion begins on wall street, and then all sorts of dark forces break out, break loose, and they start dismantling the economic and social fabric of the world. these awful events happen once every hundred years
revenue. there are various ways to can do that. we are a high-cost state. america is a holocaust -- a high-cost country. that is why, that is the way the world this. we're 4% of the world. an aging 4% with an emerging from a powerful china and india and brazil and other countries. we have to be smart to be competitive by lowering people's wages for reducing various benefits, that is problematic. the ceo's do not say you have to reduce my salary. what about for the secretary or the janitor, the person at the front desk, or the computer pro career? we have a balance here. you pull over here and push over there. we will do our best and we cannot always beat texas. you can go to arizona and do your work out of there. a lot of people still move to silicon valley because of the synergy of so many bright people. if you can get the right people, get that cleaned up so we can bring smart people here and keep them here, we will keep adopting the game. [applause] >> governor hickenlooper, this is your chance. you have here a room full of silicon valley executives. what do you say to them to get them
organization coming up in 2016 in four years, and we feel what we believe are america's best ideas. it's grand canyon, yosemite, but also stewarding america's history and that would include independence hall, gettysburg, mount rush more, and most recently flight 93. my dress uniform and that famous hat is really derived from the world war i uniform from 1916, little changed from that time. the first rangers that patroled our parks before there was a park service were calvary soldiers. the presidio here in san francisco sent buffalo soldiers up to yosemite and sequoia every summer to control the parks, to keep the poachers out and to begin the construction of roads. the first federal superintendent of sequoia national park was colonel charles young. he happened to be the third african-american to graduate from west point. he went on to become the first black colonel in the army. amazing story. i believe he'll be honored sometime later this year by some sort of a national monument at his home in ohio. so, pretty interesting fellow and pretty amazing leadership demonstrated. today our rangers acr
annenberg media ♪ captioningponsored narrator:north amers called "anglo-america" due ttwo cities--nce o butmontreal and vancouver--ada, are distcte for eir n-english societies. inancouver, on canada's pacic coas asian imgration stirs a cultural conflict are distcte for eir n-english societies. that highligs the relaonship between globalonctionstirs a cuand cal ices.ct are distcte for eir n-english societies. andavid ho is one4, of theop reaestate agents in vancouverbritish combia andavid ho is one4, of theop reaestate agents caus kwsthiclare ok in vancouverbritish combia david's family contracting business designed and built this house specifically for asian buyers, like the hong kong chinese family who will be viewing it today. inside this $1.3illion home are many luxury atures which, davidays,redemanded. e feature of ts ng roomisrsof e it's a very rge ving room. which, davidays,redemanded. e feature of ts ng roomisrsof e then it's the high ceiling. um... you know, it makes the room very spacious. narrator: space is extremely limited in the crowded city ohong kong, but in canada
senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and dads were able to save for their retirement on an equal basis with their counterparts who worked outside the home. i now it is one of her proudest achievements and i'm proud to join with the senator from merrell, senator barbara mikulski, in attempting to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course
. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it is not brazil. it's actually much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i'll talk to pulitzer-prize winning historian ann applebalm. we focus on decision making. in the depths of the financial crisis, the obama administration had an almost impossible choice -- save chrysler by injecting billions of taxpayer dollars, or let it fail and lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve rattner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the washington conventional wisdom about the ma
the dead in newtown, connecticut, and all week, the argument over the kind of guns available in america and the kind of people that can get all of them. it has gone back and forth. while the fire he said raged, the gunman killed himself. he had already spent 17 years in prison for killing his grandmother. as a convicted criminal, he was not allowed to possess firearms. a cold christmas awaits the families of two firefighters. bbc news, washington. >> in afghanistan, at least seven security officials including an american adviser have been killed by local police officers. in the first shooting, a policewoman opened fire inside the police headquarters, killing the americans. it is the first time a female member of the afghan services has turned on a member of the nato force. a report. >> the 33-year-old was a sergeant with the afghan national police, and earlier this morning, the woman shot and killed a civilian adviser. according to officials, she had planned to kill senior afghan officials but could not find any so shot the advisor instead. at the police headquarters, it is one of the m
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